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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
to space to stem-cell research to name a few. can science stay objective out of politics? alex is co-author of science left behind, feel good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. welcome. >> thank you for having me on. >> sure. you argue here that for all of the talk about republicans being the enemy of science, anti-scientific rhetoric is a by partisan project. tell me how you came to this opinion that democrats are not necessarily the party of science. >> well, on a whole host of issues, so as you know, on the right the conservatives are wrong on evolution and on climate change, and there's this it media narrative that somehow anti-science believes are unique to the right side of the political spectrum. what i found through reading a lot of science is basically that the left side also has some pet ideas not lining up with the scientific mainstream. for instance, opposition to genetic modification. the california democratic party endorsed this proportion to label food in direct opposition to the american medical association. the anti-vaccine movement started on the lef
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
science professor matthew krenston said the poll reveals unlikely allies united in opposition and for different reasons. >> for republican, gambling represents way to get resources for the expansion of government without having to impose tax. way of short circuiting the political system. that's probably why they are opposed to that. for african-americans, reasons may be a little more complex. first, many belong to religious denominations that take a dim view of gambling. second, the largest concentration of african-americans in the state is this country where the new casino would go. >> pollsteres all probed who feels more intense about the issue? 54% of those claiming that expanded gaming is most likely to get them out to the polls plan to vote against it. so the pro and con tv ads may not be helping either side's cause. >> i think if they succeeded in making people angry on both sides. >> that was david collins reporting. >>> imagine 80% voter turnout in the united states. believe it or not, that was the actual statistic voting in the 2008 presidential election in one segmen
y. 're the simplicity party. they're the -- >> are they lud indicts, anti-science? >> i think if they're convinced, as many of them are, that science is being used as a conspiracy to take away their deen- m and take away their shamovie, it's called "planet of the apes" and it wasn't a comedy pup. >>e watch fox, we listen to it, that's the message that you get. that the scientists and t aus cni t us of our freedom. >> so it's basically a fear, it's a fear of everything. take a look at this number though. the infamous birth question, was the president born in the united states. under our constitution he has t be born here to be prid rlipryvoters, 37% they do not think barack obama was born here. just 2 in 5 say the president was american born and, therefore, a legitimate president. when you ask the president's religion, this gets scary. a majority of all voters don't take him atis word. just 49%. this is all vote, sa he' st w i what he says he is. and 30% of republicans and 34% of conservative republicans say obama is a muslim. simple as that. here is the point. these bad numbe
is absolutely right, we need more of stem education, science, engineering, math, technology. there is a clear path to solving this problem. it basically must recognize we have to start producing as much or more than we consume. this whole thing about going to the walmart, yeah, it's cheap there but we have to understand the consequences. >> let me ask you about this. consumer confidence is up, a n cnnorc poll asks how the economy will be a year from now. two-thirds think it will be in better shape. that american optimism is critical but we can't fall into the traps by buying cheap stuff we don't need, it's all imported. >> nobody says it's not needed. imagine living without your iphone. >> a pair of tennis shoes. >> i agree with the point our new growth and prosperity will be made out of technology and we need education. we can't do that by bashing china. i tell you why. they are the largest foreign holder of our now $16 trillion national debt. they own over $1 trillion of u.s. treasuries. they lend to us. we buy stuff, they get dollars and then they invest back into our treasury bills, clo
anything to do with the satellite glitch in the michael sync report. we want to give your science geek viewers an update what is going on. you are among our most favorite viewers by the way so here's an update. nasa rover curiosity that landed early last month is making pretty big progress. curiosity using the robotic arm to a martian rock. first time that happened according to scientists. a laser on the end of this arm we're looking at in this picture zapped the rock and analyzed its composition. and then the rover took off on its longest drive, so far, 140 feet, which might not sound like a lot but this is taking place on mars, folks. of course the big work still lies ahead. the rover slowly but surely making its way to the foothills of a giant mountain, mount sharp. about six miles from where the roof very is right now. there is belief there is evidence of water at the base of that mountain that water once existed there and perhaps that could mean life once existed there too. the rover could start making its way toward mount sharp by the end of the year. we'll keep you posted on the
to other developed countries. the u.s. ranks 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in math. how to fix the education system was front and center in chicago this month as teachers walked off the job over issues of longer school days, merit pay and teacher evaluations. education reform is an issue in the presidential campaign. president obama and his republican challenger, mitt romney, both favor expanding charter schools, support standardized tests and want more accountability from teachers and principals. but the two men have significant disagreements. >> i think some of the main differences between governor romney and president obama when it comes to education come in the area of school choice. governor romney sees a really robust rule for school choice and school improvement whereas president obama like a lot of democrats has been skeptical of vouchers. >> reporter: romney supports taking federal dollars for educating special needs and low income families, known as title i funds and giving them directly to parents in the form of vouchers. although romney avoids using that word. >> fo
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
, you know, disbelieving in science thing, but really, at this point to say no, no, no, all these polls, except rasmussen, are faulty because they oversample-- somes is just sad. >> this is the disavow of reality that seems to be permeating the romney campaign and joe scarborough highlighted this morning. i will highlight it today, this afternoon. an op-ed in the "wall street journal" by jason riley that says mr. romney would do better to focus more on reducinged his unforced errors and less on the fourth estate's political bias if whining about the liberal media was a winning strategy for republicans newt gingrich would be the nominee. hugo, i will call your attention -- >> liberal media. >> new york times hugo lingren, this i think is really -- i like this because it references stink bombs also. the ap quoting michael mcdonald of george mason university which tracks early voting saying if you wait until the election prior to the election to release your stink bomb you've lost coloradans. if you've got the game changer you have to do that soon. >> i agree with that. look, the romney ca
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. my next guest has a long history on wall street and washington. in the '80s, robert hormats was secretary of affairs. he was vice chairman of goldman sachs. basically, he's a big shot. welcome, bob. great to have you on the program. >> always a pleasure. >> so much to talk about. where are you just back from? >> i was at the conference, the apec conference in the russian far east, which is booming with energy and a lot of other things. >> are they not getting impacted by europe? you have europe a complete mess, china slowing down. how worried are you about global growth? >> i am worried about global growth. i don't think it's a crisis. certainly many parts of europe are slowing down. china is slowing down, although it's still growing at a reasonable rate. certainly we're going to see a slow down. it's one that need not lead to a sharp downturn. it'll certainly slow growth around the world and will certainly adversely affect tr
is clearly -- doesn't even understand the science of a woman's body, over a democrat. that just seems kind of -- everything you're saying is right but just with todd akin he's not just like -- it wasn't a gaffe. it's just odd. >> remember it wasn't a gaffe. he sponsored a bill on this. >> yes. >> cosponsored by paul ryan. it wasn't just -- it wasn't a slip of the tongue. this was their position. the entire, you know, house had been, you know -- the tea party wing of the house had been fighting for this. >> the reason they can get away with it in this race, think back mark foley became a national issue in a congressional race in 2006 where it was bad for the party nationally. because it's a presidential year, there's so much more attention that's going to go on the presidential election it is likely the case that the party -- you won't have a national discussion over this anymore over -- even though you might in other cases. the price is probably relatively low. as ryan was saying, if they are amoral things more important to try to win the majority than worry about the longer term implicati
, recruiting and training math and science teachers to get our children prepared for those important jobs. >> those are goals. those are goals and mitt romney has goals. but when are -- >> no, no andrea -- >> specific. >> it is not a goal to end tax breaks for companies that move jobs overseas and incentivize them to come back and create a million jobs in manufacturingp. we've seen the greatest increase in manufacturing jobs in more than 20 years under this president. so we have a sense of what has to happen in order to bring those businesses back and create those jobs. those aren't goals. you know, reducing our dependence on foreign oil by increasing our domestic production incentivizing clean energy to create jobs and put people back to work, those aren't goals, those are plans to continue to move this economy forward. look, i also hope that mitt romney will take some of the time paul ryan didn't want to take in his interview this weekend and try to explain the arithmetic behind their budget. paul ryan said it would take too long to explain their budget plan. the problem isn't the time
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." now filling in for bill, here's john fuglesang. >> john: i have the best ring in town. if you call me during the show, will you hear the coolest ring tone. >> is that right? joan the pop song of the past four years that makes the coolest possible ring tone. >> i'm tempted to call you. >> john: i will have to share it. everyone will steal it. when you have a pop song come out of your phone, it is usually jarring. i found the perfect one. it is the rolling stones. this is the "bill press show." you have to guess which show. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning long. we're taking your calls. apparent there is a debate tomorrow. i wish the media would talk about this a little bit. i've never seen the media talk about something that hasn't happened yet more than they talk about the stuff
cyber networks and systems safe. we have a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on-line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from an
more science and math teachers, reduce oil imports and give tax breaks to companies that invest in the u.s. wolf. >> brianna keilar on the campaign trail with the president. thanks very much. the attack on the american consulate in benghazi, libya, is still raising lots and lots of questions including who was behind it all? our own arwa damon goes into the mouth of the lion for an up close look at the rise of extremists right now in libya. [ woman ] it's 32 minutes to go time, and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop coordandheator's phone are working on a joke with local color. e secure cloud just received ategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... ♪ atmix of energies.ve the world needs a broader that's why we're sup
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. septic disasters are disgusting and costly, but avoidable. the rid-x septic subscriber program helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv. this is the bill press show. >> it is tweeted paul ryan is so frustrated with mitt romney, he hopes liam neeson comes to rescue the campaign. i'm john fugelsang sitting in for bill. thank you so much for spending your morning with us. we are taking your calls at 866-55-press. we're talking all about the debate this week and all about the campaign. we are talking about the gift of comedy that is jerry brown's admirable of banning reparative gay behavior. >> i think you cover issues that a lot of men care about too. >> i hope men care about those issues. >> a lot of men care about
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
nomg or science that we stable an h1b visa to them so they can stay in this country and help grow jobs here. he has always made keeping families together part of his comprehensive immigration reform. >> but he has never said that he would let these visas stand that the president just granted. >> no, no, no. what you just said to me was he said he was going to have it taken care of. meaning that he has said that among his top priorities would be working with congress, enacting a comprehensive immigration reform. of which keeping families together would be part ofhat program. so i think it's totally consistent with what he said, because it's a top priority of his to get done. and unlike this president, he would get it done in the first two years of his administration. >> it may be consistent but you do agree what he told the denver post last night is new. it is new news as we say in the news business. he's never said that before. >> well, you may be saying he never used those same words in the same sentence before. but if you go ahead and look at mitt romney dotcom where he laid out his
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
educational system with new math and science teachers. a whole host of things that we can continue to do to strengthen our economy, put the middle class back to work, and give them a real sense of security. >> the pew research center came out with a poll. they asked the question, who will do a better job in wednesday's debate? this is registered voters. look at this, robert, 51% thought the president would do a better job. romney, 29%. i assume this puts a lot of pressure on the president. he's really got to deliver, doesn't he? >> reporter: well, look, you know, i think the president certainly has come on to the scene, and you heard him give big speeches, but this is a very different format. you know, the president hasn't done this in four years, but, look, and i think the president looks at this not as a boxing match, or as you've heard the romney campaign talk about they're practicing zingers and, you know, sharp lines. i think what the president, again, wants too is have a direct conversation with the american people. talk to them about where they are and where we need to go. and i t
existed in people's imagination. >> today we're looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow tease reality, the self-driving car. >> reporter: it's called an autonomous vehicle. google has been testing a dozen prius models equipped with sensors allowing them to drive themselves. >> think the self-driving car can improve the quality of life for everyone here in california, in the country and in the world. >> reporter: on tuesday the governor signed a bill directing the steal's dmv to come up with regulations for licensing and operating driverless autos by 2015. he discovered there's many questions yet to be answered. >> so if a self-driving car runs a red light and gets nabbed by the camera, who gets the ticket? >> whoever owns the car, i think. we'll work that out. that's the easiest problem to work out. >> self-trying cars don't run red lights. >> rules regulating self-driving cars are on the way, cars themselves are still being developed. for cbs "this morning," ben tracey, los angeles. >>> so you ready for driverless car? >> no. didn't they tell you when you learn to drive do the 10 and
. there are different flavors all come down to science. commercial tomatoes have been scientifically bred to be inexpensive, easy to ship and avail scrabble all year round. nothing wrong with that says this tomato researcher. >> it's an economical crop. part of the reason is the farmer wants maximum yield out of his field. so we have a lot to thank the industry for for developing these. and nobody at that point expected it would have anything to do with the flavor of the fruit when they are ripened. >> reporter: at her lab, powell discovered hybrid commercial tomatoes no longer carry one gene found in heir looms. without it they produce less sugar. in our instant test one off the shelf tomato had just half the sugar. >> 5.5. >> reporter: of the heir loom tomato. sue fwar is only one reason that heirlooms may taste better. >> it smells so good. >> reporter: where and how they are grown counts for a lot. >> tomatoes you get at the supermarket, they look perfect. this one doesn't look perfect. >> to me it looks perfect. >> reporter: these garden variety tomatoes are anything but average to t
the latest science at the institute of medicine which determined the appropriate amount of calories. you know, savannah, the white house pints out that most students 850 calories will be enough, and we're talking about fighting incidents of obesity. >> for student athletes if it's a concern they can bring a snack from home. mara schiavocampo, thanks very much. >> coming up next, brian williams with mitt romney talking about what romney would do to fix our schools, right after this. [ phil ] i have a toyota camry hybrid. [ man ] tell me about that. [ phil ] katie and i talked about really committing to making a difference in the amount of gas that we use. she was using 8 to 10 tankfuls. i was using 5 tankfuls. now i use one tankful a month, and she may use about two. it drives like a sports car. it handles very well. people are a little surprised that a hybrid zipped by them the way that i do. [ male announcer ] see phil's story and more at the camry effect. camry from toyota. a kraft homestyle mac & cheese bowl. it's yours for a mere 30 minutes of a pg-13 movie. [ alien noises ] [ male announ
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)